Spillage in the lab will always be possible, even though workers, scientists, lab supervisors, and students practice the safety shower Australian standards mandated frequently. In manufacturing factories where spillage is also prevalent, certain preventive measures are studied and practiced to avoid further damages. How do you practice Spill Response? Where do you start?

In this article, the nature of spillage in workplace and safety shower Australian standards mandated will be discussed. References such as the University of Queensland’s Chemical Spill Response Guideline and Occupational Health and Safety Unit and Health and Safety Fact Sheet on Navigating the Chemical Guideline will be used.

safety shower australian standard

Nature of Spillage in Workplace

Where does chemical spillage usually occur? It can occur anywhere from school laboratories to legitimate science labs. Spillage occurs because of carelessness, breaking down of equipment, or in more dangerous situations, because of natural circumstances like flood or fire.

Safety guidelines may be incorporated at the early stage of lab use and are continuously practiced, but this isn’t enough. Laboratory personnel must have a spill response plan that indicates all the necessary procedures, tools needed, and people to contact when chemical spillage happens.

The procedures must:

  • Dictate how to use a safety shower test kit and spill kits Brisbane companies provide.
  • Guide the lab supervisors and personnel how to design a spill response plan of their own, as labs can have different purposes and designs
  • Include a step-by-step instruction for a minor and general clean-up

Safety shower Australian standards mandated

The Australian Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment AS 4775-2007 is a set of standardized criteria for safety shower and emergency eyewash stations that are to be used in case of chemical exposure on the skin and the eyes. It was prepared by the Council of Standards Australia and published last October 2007.

If you’re interested in purchasing safety showers that were approved and verified by that standard, you may try contacting Absorb Environment Solutions, a veteran in the spill response industry. They have an integrated product that includes a combination of eye or face wash and a deluge shower. It’s priced at $1515. It’s ideal for any workspace that stores and manages hazardous chemical directly. For off-site locations and temporary stations, they recommend the portable unit that provides water with an anti-microbial additive.

How do you manage chemical spills on your own?

The University of Queensland’s Chemical Spill Response Guideline and Occupational Health and Safety Unit suggest that you prepare a spill response for both major and minor spills.

Every lab or workplace must have spill kits. These are common items that can be found in the lab or special items designated to absorb or treat chemicals like Bromine, Hydrofluoric Acid, Mercury, Acid and Caustic Spills, and Alkali Metals. These spill kits may be for maintenance and emergency response, which is sold by vendors like Absorb Environmental Solutions. They can be bought for $69-$71.00. They also provide spill kit training for workers.

Meanwhile, the Safety Unit and Health and Safety Fact Sheet on Navigating the Chemical Guideline strongly encourages each workplace to make emergency plans that contain chemical response strategies. It would also help to practice Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) and train employees to respond to chemical spillage properly.

If you’re interested in courses and training, you can browse https://absorbenviro.com.au/ for a training for spill response called Absorb NRT – Spill Response Team Training. In the course, you will learn how to identify and minimise environmental hazards for about $2,250 per session.